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IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH: IDIOMS AND PHRASES(part-8)

    admin

    June 19, 2013

    verbal_ability

     

    A FAIR CRACK AT: A chance to try your luck; opportunity to fix or solve a problem; an opening or possibility to show how well you can do. “I know I could be a good movie actress if I were given a fair crack at it.” “If I were given a fair crack at solving the traffic problem, I’d have it fixed within three months.” “If I am given the chance of becoming the company managing director, I’m sure I’d be a success. All I need is a fair crack at it.”

    A FAIR LOT OF GOOD THAT WILL DO: That won’t help much; won’t make matters better; won’t do any good; won’t improve the situation. “You can invest another million in your business, but a fat lot of good that will do, if your business, but a fat lot of good that will do, if your cost of investment continues to exceed profits from sales.” “You can fill the tank of the car with gas, but a fat lot of good that will do if you don’t get the fuel pump fixed as well.” “You may have a good business plan, but a fat lot of good that will do if you can’t find the cash for the start-up costs.”

    A FAT LOT YOU CARE!: Indicates you know that other person has no sympathy or understanding for you. “I’m falling apart emotionally because I’m disappointed about our love, but a fat lot you care!” “Your hate and greed have driven me to destruction, but a fat lot you care!” “I’ve never been through such terrible suffering in my life, but I can see you have absolutely no pity for me. A fat lot you care!”

    A FATE WORSE THAN DEATH: Suffering that is so bad that dying would be easier or maybe better. “Being in a state of insufferable pain for months and months is a fate worse than death itself.” “Loving someone who is burning with hatred towards you can be compared with a fate worse than death, but being married to my wife would surely put you to the test.”

    A FEATHER IN YOUR CAP: Just as in the old days when hunters wore a fine-looking feather, stuck into the band of their caps, as a sign of their hunting skill, so, now days, we can say someone deserves a feather in his cap when he has done something well or worthy of recognition. “You deserve a feather in your cap for all the time you have devoted to community services.” “Collins deserves a feather in his cap for solving the math problem in half the time it took the others.” “Winning a Nobel Prize is the highest modern-day-equivalent of wearing a feather in your cap.”

    A FEELING-FRENZY: Just as man-eating piranha fish will swarm to a chunk of flesh, which is thrown into the water, and have a feeding frenzy, so “mass media reporters, for example, can swarm to the scene a and have a ‘feeding frenzy’ wherever a big star  is involved in a public scandal.” “The press had a feeding frenzy when the big Tsunami hit South East Asia, killing in excess of forty thousand victims.” “It is despicable the way that the press can create a feeding frenzy when disaster strikes, because the viewing audience is hungry for information.”

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